200 Doctors Drive, Panama City, FL 32405
(850) 784-7722
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HURRICANE UPDATE: Our phones and internet are up and running and we have resumed our normal business hours. Our office will be closed 11/21, 11/22 and 11/23 for the holiday.
MON-THUR: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm, FRI: 9:00 am - 11:00 am

Skin

In many cases, moles are not dangerous, just annoying. However, moles that occur after the age of thirty or those that look different from existing moles may be cancerous. Moles are formed by cells called melanocytes; they can appear alone or in clusters. For most adults, it is quite normal to have between ten and forty moles by adulthood.

You can have your moles removed if you do not like their appearance or if they pose a risk to your health. They can cause discomfort when they rub against clothing or are caught in your jewelry. The basic mole removal procedure is a minor surgery that involves snipping off the affected skin tags, which sometimes may require to be stitched depending on how deep the incisions are.

Skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the USA today. The suspected causes of skin cancer today include Ultraviolet radiation from the sun as the primary case, as well as artificial sunlamps and tanning booths. The thinning of the earth’s protective ozone layer could be the reason why there is an alarming rise in the number of skin cancers today. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common and least dangerous type of skin cancer because it rarely spreads beyond the original site.

It is advisable to treat this type cancer because although it is rarely life threatening, it can grow into the underlying tissue and bone to cause serious damage. A plastic surgeon is an important part of the treatment process to avoid unsightly scars or permanent changes in facial structures after removal of the affected skin.

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Awards & Accreditations

FPS
PCIS
Facil Plastic Reconstructive Surgery
Medical Justice